Bruce Willis’ wife shares video of actor playing basketball following aphasia diagnosis

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Bruce Willis’ basketball skills were shown off by his wife Emma Heming in a new video.

Heming shared a video of Willis and three friends playing basketball in a driveway. The 67-year-old actor wore khaki pants with a long-sleeve shirt and paired the outfit with a hat.

“I see you BeeDub,” Emma, 43, captioned the video.

Willis and Emma got married in 2009 and share two children, Mabel and Evelyn. The actor was previously married to Demi Moore. 

Willis and Moore share daughters Rumer, Scout and Tallulah.

Bruce Willis’ wife showed off the actor’s basketball skills with a video shared to Instagram following his aphasia diagnosis.
(Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket)

BRUCE WILLIS’ CO-STAR TOM CAVANAGH SAYS IT WAS A ‘PRVELEGE’ WORKING WITH THE ACTOR IN ONE OF HIS FINAL ROLES

Willis’ family announced the actor was retiring after being diagnosed with aphasia. 

“Bruce’s amazing supporters, as a family we wanted to share that our beloved Bruce has been experiencing some health issues and has recently been diagnosed with aphasia, which is impacting his cognitive abilities. As a result of this and with much consideration Bruce is stepping away from the career that has meant so much to him,” the family statement said.

It continued: “This is a really challenging time for our family and we are so appreciative of your continued love, compassion and support. We are moving through this as a strong family unit, and wanted to bring his fans in because we know how much he means to you, as you do to him.”

Willis' family recently announced the actor was retiring following his aphasia diagnosis.

Willis’ family recently announced the actor was retiring following his aphasia diagnosis.
(Rich Fury)

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“As Bruce always says, ‘Live it up’ and together we plan to do just that,” read the statement, written on behalf of his wife, Emma, his ex-wife Demi Moore and his daughters.

Apashia affects the ability to communicate.

“It typically occurs suddenly after a stroke or a head injury but can also come on gradually from a slow-growing brain tumor or a disease that causes progressive, permanent damage (degenerative),” Mayo Clinic explains on its website.

Asphasia affects a person's ability to communicate.

Asphasia affects a person’s ability to communicate.
(VCG)

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